Deng Palomares and Athanassios Tsikliras in Vancouver 2022

EcoScope coordinator visits the Sea Around Us at UBC


Following a recent meeting in Toulouse, the EcoScope Project coordinator, Athanassios Tsikliras of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, visited Vancouver in mid-November with the goal of strengthening the collaboration between the project and its UBC partners.

EcoScope is an initiative that aims to promote an effective and efficient, ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management.

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Black Snapper (or black and white snapper), Macolor niger at Gota Sorayer, Red Sea, Egypt. Photo by Derek Keats, Wikimedia Commons.

What if we stopped thinking of fish as commodities?

Black Snapper (or black and white snapper), Macolor niger at Gota Sorayer, Red Sea, Egypt. Photo by Derek Keats, Wikimedia Commons.

Black Snapper (or black and white snapper), Macolor niger at Gota Sorayer, Red Sea, Egypt. Photo by Derek Keats, Wikimedia Commons.

In a recent piece published in the journal PLOS Biology, the Sea Around Us alumna and NYU professor Jennifer Jacquet, and our principal investigator, Daniel Pauly, ponder the idea of wild fish and invertebrates being considered more like wild animals and less like tradable commodities.

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Penang Hill vampire crab

A fisheries scientist in Penang, Malaysia

Penang Hill vampire crab

Penang Hill vampire crab (Geosesarma faustum). Photo by Alex Tilley.

By Daniel Pauly

In early September 2022, I found myself on the island of Penang, Malaysia, where WorldFish, an international research center focusing on tropical fish culture, is headquartered. WorldFish is the new name of the International Centre for Living Aquatic Resources Management (ICLARM), previously located in Manila, the Philippines, of which I was a staff member from 1979 to 1994, and a consultant for five more years. The occasion was the annual meeting of the FishBase Consortium, whose members ensure that FishBase and related databases and products remain up to date and relevant to multiple constituencies worldwide.

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Local stakeholder involvement key to understanding protection level of MPAs

Local stakeholder involvement key to understanding protection level of MPAs

Local stakeholder involvement key to understanding protection level of MPAs
Red pencil urchin at the Papahānaumokuākea MPA. Photo by James Watt, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service – Pacific Region, Wikimedia Commons.

Knowledge provided by local stakeholders such as non-governmental organizations, academics, civil servants, journalists, and fishers can be valuable for evaluating the effectiveness of countries’ marine protected areas (MPAs).

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Trilobites’ growth may have resembled that of modern marine crustaceans

Trilobites’ growth may have resembled that of modern marine crustaceans

Trilobites’ growth may have resembled that of modern marine crustaceans

A Triarthrus eatoni trilobite, 11 mm long, found in the Frankfort Shale, New York, USA. Photo by Dwergenpaartje, Wikimedia Commons.

Trilobites- extinct marine arthropods that roamed the world’s oceans from about 520 million years ago until they went extinct 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian period – may have grown in a similar fashion and reached ages that match those of extant crustaceans, a new study has found.

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New sea garden story map showcases Indigenous mariculture practices across the Pacific

New sea garden story map showcases Indigenous mariculture practices across the Pacific

New sea garden story map showcases Indigenous mariculture practices across the Pacific

Clam garden in the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia, Canada. Photo by John Harper, courtesy of Simon Fraser University.

A few years ago, while waiting for a connecting flight at Houston Airport, the Sea Around Us PI Daniel Pauly challenged Simon Fraser University resource & environmental management professor Anne Salomon to put clam gardens in a global context by mapping them along with similar Indigenous maricultural innovations around the world.

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Turquoise water Arabian Sea diving spot

Sea Around Us research included in ‘definitive volume on large marine ecosystems’

Turquoise water Arabian Sea diving spot
Arabian Sea. Photo by Naveen Gollapalli, Wikimedia Commons.

Research produced by current and past members of the Sea Around Us has been included in what
is being described as “a definitive volume on large marine ecosystems.”

The book, titled Ocean
sustainability: Assessing and managing the world’s large marine ecosystems
,
presents best assessment and management practices based on examples from 37
years of published peer-reviewed papers on large marine ecosystems or LMEs.


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Sea sponges need oxygen, as fish and people do

Sea sponges need oxygen, as fish and people do

Sea sponges need oxygen, as fish and people do

Wool sponge. Photo by Mark Butler.

The inconspicuous sea sponges are Earth’s oldest multicellular animals and have filtered the oceans for nearly 900 million years, long before the first plants appeared on land. New research appearing in the journal Fisheries Bulletin, published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, indicates that their growth depends on their oxygen supply in a manner similar to more complex animals such as fish.

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Protecting 30 per cent of the ocean by 2030 would barely impact fisheries

Protecting 30 per cent of the ocean by 2030 would barely impact fisheries

Protecting 30 per cent of the ocean by 2030 would barely impact fisheries

A view from the north on the Marine Protected Area of Capo Carbonara and the island of Cavoli in Sardinia, Italy. Photo by dronepicr, Flickr.

Conserving marine biodiversity, avoiding species extinction and maintaining food security from wild capture fisheries can all be achieved simultaneously if a global, non-regionalized approach to marine spatial management is undertaken by the signatories of IUCN Resolution 50, which calls for the protection of 30 per cent of the ocean by 2030.

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JAHutchings_Jan_2017 (1)

Jeffrey Hutchings


Jeffrey Hutchings. Photo by Alexfern, Wikimedia Commons.

By Daniel Pauly.

Jeffrey Hutchings, a friend, colleague and mentor to many at the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, passed away in late January 2022 at 63 years of age. His eulogy in the Globe and Mail emphasized that he “firmly believed in the value of ensuring that public-policy decisions are guided by unbiased research.”[1]


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