High impact fishing dominates catches in many parts of the world

High impact fishing dominates catches in many parts of the world

High impact fishing dominates catches in many parts of the world
Icelandic stern trawler. Photo by Mahlum, Wikimedia Commons.

A new report by leading fisheries experts found that over 99 percent of bottom trawling worldwide occurs inside the Exclusive Economic Zones of coastal nations—with much of the effort focused within just 12 miles of shore— posing risks to critical habitats and traditional, small-scale, artisanal fishing operations. As the only globally significant fishing practice that requires sustained contact with the seabed, bottom trawling has a uniquely high impact, one that can drive habitat destruction, coastal conflict and major fuel-related carbon emissions.

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What really makes fish become sexually active

What really makes fish become sexually active

What really makes fish become sexually active

Mandarin fish mating. Image by Klaus Stiefel, Flickr.

Discounting anthropogenic-induced changes, the seasonally oscillating environments where long-lived fish hatch and grow remain more or less the same throughout the course of their lives. This means that the common explanation that states that fish become sexually active – or spawn for the first time – after experiencing certain environmental stimuli does not properly explain this phenomenon.

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High cod catches could have been sustained in Eastern Canada for decades, simple stock assessment method shows

High cod catches could have been sustained in Eastern Canada for decades, simple stock assessment method shows

High cod catches could have been sustained in Eastern Canada for decades, simple stock assessment method shows_Image by Phillip_Meintzer _Wikimedia
Fishing for Atlantic cod off the southern coast of Fogo Island, Newfoundland. Photo by Phillip Meintzer, Wikimedia Commons.

A simple fish stock assessment model applied to over 500 years of catch data demonstrated that if Canadian authorities had allowed for the rebuilding of the stock of northern Atlantic cod off Newfoundland and Labrador in the 1980s, annual catches of about 200,000 tonnes could have been sustained.

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