Small-scale fisheries can back food security efforts in Arabian Sea countries

Small-scale fisheries can back food security efforts in Arabian Sea countries

Small-scale fisheries can back food security efforts in Arabian Sea countries
Iranian fishing boat in the Arabian Sea. Public Domain photo from US National Archives.

Countries surrounding the Arabian Sea should empower well-managed artisanal and subsistence fisheries to back food security efforts, a new Sea Around Us study suggests.

In a chapter titled “The fisheries of the Arabian Sea Large Marine Ecosystem,” included in the book The Arabian Seas: Biodiversity, Environmental Challenges and Conservation Measures published by Springer Nature, Sea Around Us researchers describe the fisheries in the exclusive economic zones of Somalia, Djibouti, Yemen, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Iran, Pakistan and India’s Malabar coast, as well as in the region’s high seas.

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Understanding why fish grow the way they do and getting serious about it

Understanding why fish grow the way they do and getting serious about it

Understanding why fish grow the way they do and getting serious about it

Fish gills. Image by 2427999, Pixabay.

The distribution and concentration of dissolved oxygen and water temperature in the oceans and freshwaters are usually far more influential in shaping the growth and reproduction of fish than the distribution of their prey.

In a new paper in Science Advances, Daniel Pauly, principal investigator of the Sea Around Us initiative at UBC’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, argues that scientists need to avoid attaching human attributes to fish and start looking at their unique biology and constraints through a different lens.

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Preliminary assessments of 26 West African fish stocks hint at overexploited populations

Preliminary assessment of 26 West African fish stocks points at overexploited populations

Preliminary assessments of 26 West African fish stocks hint at overexploited populations

Bonga shad (Ethmalosa fimbriat) taken from the waters of Guinea Bissau. Photo by Falia, Wikimedia Commons.

Twenty-six fish and invertebrate populations that live in the waters of eight West African countries are likely overfished or at risk of being overfished, a new Fisheries Centre Research Report reveals.

Preliminary results from the application of the CMSY and LBB stock assessment methods to fish populations in the EEZs of Cape Verde, The Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mauritania, Senegal and Sierra Leone, indicate that some stocks – such as that of cassava croaker off the coast of Liberia – are strongly overexploited.

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