Using data to better manage fisheries subsidies

Tim Cashion in Geneva.

Tim Cashion in Geneva.

Text and photos by Tim Cashion.

In early October, I had the opportunity to travel to Geneva to present on behalf of Sea Around Us and the Fisheries Economics Research Unit for a roundtable discussion on fisheries subsidies. The discussion was convened by the E15 Initiative and the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development. The ICTSD has been working closely with Rashid Sumaila of the Fisheries Economics Research Unit for several years on the topic of fisheries subsidies. They have used his research in partnership with Sea Around Us to inform countries of the amounts of fisheries subsidies and designated them as the good (beneficial), the bad (harmful), and the ugly (ambiguous).

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Photo by Jean Pierre Larroque, One Earth Future.

Somali fisheries urgently need better data

Phot by Jean Pierre Larroque, One Earth Future.

Photo by Jean Pierre Larroque, One Earth Future.

In order to back government efforts to overcome the likely legacy effects of illegal fishing and piracy, stakeholders of Somali fisheries should emphasize improvements to their catch data, a new study finds. The paper, recently published in Marine Policy, also reveals that the amount of fish taken out of the country’s waters over the past six decades was 80 per cent higher than officially reported.

The paper, produced by scientists with the Sea Around Us at the University of British Columbia, the Sea Around Us – Indian Ocean at the University of Western Australia, One Earth Future’s Secure Fisheries program and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, shows how the lack of proper oversight, monitoring and control in years prior to the establishment of the new Federal Government in 2012 allowed for industrial foreign vessels to exploit Somali marine resources or to operate under dubious licenses.

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Photo by vjpaul, Flickr.

Vanuatu’s hidden stats: small-scale fisheries’ catch 200% higher than reported

Photo by vjpaul, Flickr.

Photo by vjpaul, Flickr.

Vanuatu’s small-scale fisheries’ catch is over 200 per cent higher than the numbers reported between 1950 and 2014 by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization on behalf of the country.

According to a new study by the Sea Around Us and several French and Vanuatu scientists, almost eight out of 10 residents of the archipelagic country are involved in at least one form of fishing and most of what truly local fisheries catch goes to their own household consumption.

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Photo by Jens Bludau, Wikimedia Commons.

World’s largest marine reserve to protect high-value species from climate change-driven exploitation: research

Photo by Jens Bludau, Wikimedia Commons.

Photo by Jens Bludau, Wikimedia Commons.

Famous through the mutiny on the Bounty in 1789, one of the most remote places in the world may play a crucial role for future marine resource sustainability. Projected increases in sea surface temperature, ocean acidification and shifts in the current strength in the South Pacific gyre are projected to enlarge tuna populations around the British Overseas Territory of Pitcairn Islands.

These are the findings of a recent study published in Frontiers in Marine Science by scientists with the Sea Around Us, a research initiative at the University of British Columbia and the University of Western Australia.

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Missing Catch Daniel and Dirk

Film based on the Sea Around Us research triumphs at festivals

Missing Catch Daniel and Dirk
Not only An Ocean Mystery: The Missing Catch made headlines when it premiered on Earth Day 2017 at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, but it has also been collecting awards in different parts of the globe.

This 40-minute long documentary directed by Alison Barrat from the Khaled Sultan Living Oceans Foundation follows the Sea Around Us Principal Investigator, Daniel Pauly, as he and his colleagues piece together a more realistic true picture of the amount of fish we have taken from our oceans and the speed at which we are running out of fish.

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