Missing Catch Daniel and Dirk

Film based on the Sea Around Us research triumphs at festivals

Missing Catch Daniel and Dirk
Not only An Ocean Mystery: The Missing Catch made headlines when it premiered on Earth Day 2017 at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, but it has also been collecting awards in different parts of the globe.

This 40-minute long documentary directed by Alison Barrat from the Khaled Sultan Living Oceans Foundation follows the Sea Around Us Principal Investigator, Daniel Pauly, as he and his colleagues piece together a more realistic true picture of the amount of fish we have taken from our oceans and the speed at which we are running out of fish.

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Nature discards 2

Nature features the Sea Around Us’ discards paper

Nature published, both in its print and online editions, a brief feature on the Sea Around Us’ paper “Global marine fisheries discards: a synthesis of reconstructed data,” which appeared in Fish & Fisheries last June.

According to the research, conducted by Dirk Zeller, Tim Cashion, Deng Palomares and Daniel Pauly, industrial fishing fleets have been dumping nearly 10 million tonnes of good fish back into the ocean every year for the past 10 years.

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Alaska Pollock. Photo by NOAA FishWatch, Wikimedia Commons.

Ten million tonnes of fish wasted every year despite declining fish stocks

Alaska Pollock. Photo by NOAA FishWatch, Wikimedia Commons.

Alaska Pollock. Photo by NOAA FishWatch, Wikimedia Commons.

Industrial fishing fleets dump nearly 10 million tonnes of good fish back into the ocean every year, according to new research.

The study by researchers with the Sea Around Us – Indian Ocean at the University of Western Australia, and the Sea Around Us, an initiative at the University of British Columbia, reveals that almost 10 per cent of the world’s total catch in the last decade was discarded due to poor fishing practices and inadequate management. This is equivalent to throwing back enough fish to fill about 4,500 Olympic sized swimming pools every year.

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Photo by Tak, Flickr.

Thought Antarctica’s biodiversity was doing well? Think again

Photo by Tak, Flickr.

Photo by Tak, Flickr.

Twenty-three experts involved in the study “Antarctica and the strategic plan for biodiversity,” recently published in PLoS Biology, debunked the popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a better environmental shape than the rest of the world. In fact, the difference between the status of biodiversity in the region and planet Earth as a whole is negligible.

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